New Glasses

I’m getting new glasses today.

I’ve had quite a horrible day –

It seems like no one adjusts but me,

Despite me knowing that I can be

A little impatient sometimes

Although that’s really the smallest of crimes.

I’m getting new glasses today,

And I’m getting quite excited – I think I may

See things anew, if you know what I mean,

And maybe my family will seem a little less mean

Than they do right now –

It’s silly, I’ll avow,

But I wish

For more fish

Like the poor would

For more food.

I’m getting new glasses today,

And I dare to hope that it may

Be the beginning of something, something new;

Something glamorous and hope-filled too.

I could get a job;

I may write a book;

Or maybe get caught up

In the most glorious hook-up –

The possibilities are endless,

That’s what I’m trying to say;

Anything could happen –

I’m getting new glasses today!

After the Tower Scene

Light and Shade Challenge again, yay! This time’s quote is:

She tells enough white lies to ice a wedding cake – Margot Asquith

I had a little fun with this one to make up for last time’s seriousness. Just a little peek into the Capulet balcony after the famous tower scene.


 

“Who’re you talking to, Juliet?”

“No one, Nurse, I was just…reciting poetry.”

“At this late hour?”

“Just practicing for recitation.”

“Recitation? For whom?”

“The, erm, my mother. She wanted to hear me recite.”

“When?”

“…Friday.”

“Mhm. Lovely night, isn’t it? I think I’ll join you for a bit of air.”

“No!”

“No?”

“Yes, I mean, I’d love to have you join me, but there’s a cobweb here. I know you hate spiders. Plus, I think I’m coming down with something….ugh ugh….see? No, wait, don’t – !”

“Hmm, I could’ve sworn…”

“See? Nothing.”

“Hmph. Get inside. And lock up behind you.”

Reflections and Revolutions

Trifecta‘s latest:

WORM (transitive verb)

1a :  to proceed or make (one’s way) insidiously or deviously<worm their way into positions of power     — Bill Franzen>

:  to insinuate or introduce (oneself) by devious or subtle means
:  to cause to move or proceed in or as if in the manner of a worm

:  to wind rope or yarn spirally round and between the strands of (a cable or rope) before serving

“Mirror, mirror, on the wall, who’s – “

“Not all of us are showoffs, you know. Nor you queens. Sheesh.”

“I bought you to reflect, not deflect; I’ll worm it outta you soon enough.”

Held by Cement

Trifextra: Week 102

This week we’re asking for exactly 33 of your own words about love gone wrong.  But we’re asking that you not use any of the following words:

love
sad
tears
wept
heart
pain

 

I made you known; you helped me grow

We gave new hope; gave off a glow

Of shy beauty, resilience;

We attracted life and lens

Until, dear Wall, you crumbled

And I tumbled.

-Sunflower

A Funny Legacy

 

Daily Prompt: Ha Ha Ha

June 21, 2013

Tell us a joke! Knock-knock joke, long story with a unexpected punchline, great zinger — all jokes are welcome!

[http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/06/21/daily-prompt-funny/]

Once upon a time there was a funny old man who told a joke a day to anyone who was willing to listen. Some days he told knock knock jokes, other days he narrated long stories with unexpected punchlines. Once in a while, he’d drop great zingers. The old man had no family, and the townspeople all knew him as an eccentric old man, but a little mad.

Finally one day, the old man died. The doctor was summoned. Upon examination, he found that the old man had been clutching a piece of paper in his hand, bearing what seemed to be a riddle.

“At the end of the last road

If a man his knees showed

To the ants scurrying merrily

Then find would he my legacy…”

the doctor read out.

Immediately the man gathered there out of curiosity hushed the doctor and began debating excitedly as to the nature of the riddle, and the supposed treasure, running out to spread the word and get a head start.

Overnight, the man became the most loved man of the town, people declaring their undying affection and swearing up and down that they’d find it because of the “special connection” they’d had with him.

“I remember when he told me the joke about the badger…,” they used to begin to reminisce.

Or, “I did my share of kindnesses to the poor fellow. He would love it when I lent him an ear to share those wonderful little jokes of his…”

Or, better still, “I shall cherish the jokes he told me. Poor man, he was like a grandfather to me. I’m convinced he hid his answer in the jokes he told me.”

For weeks after, many of the townsfolk were found trying their luck, ruminating over the many jokes the man had told, running to the town borders and hitching up their trousers near anthills, until the grounds became a common place for relaxation and communal merriment. Dances were held there, and parties and picnics as well.

A year later, at the funeral of another of the town members, a mourner happened to come across the old man’s grave. Remembering all the attempts they had made to find his treasure, the boy gave a wry smile and read the epitaph.

At the end of the last road

If a man his knees showed,

To the ants scurrying merrily

Then find would he my legacy.

A frown maybe, annoyance untold,

from greed to find another’s gold.

But he’ll laugh finally to see my legacy

Was the unity gained in comedy.